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Yahoo Health News
Child TB deaths set to fall as Kenya launches new drugs
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 20:18:35 -0400
By Katy Migiro NAIROBI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - More children are likely to survive tuberculosis, the leading infectious disease killer, after Kenya introduces child-friendly medicines on Oct. 1 - the first country in the world to do so. Some 155,000 children with TB are set to benefit across 18 countries that have already ordered the new medicines and are preparing to roll them out, starting with Kenya, according to the TB Alliance campaign group that oversaw their development. "Now, with the appropriate treatments, we can make rapid progress in finding and treating children with TB so we can achieve a TB free generation," Kenya's health minister Cleopa Mailu said in a statement on Tuesday.
Mother sues U.S. hospital for discriminating against dead transgender son
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 18:13:16 -0400
The mother of a transgender boy filed a lawsuit against a U.S. hospital on Monday claiming its medical staff repeatedly addressed her son - who later committed suicide - as a girl. In the landmark case, Katharine Prescott argues the Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego (RCHSD) in California discriminated against her transgender son based on his sex. The 14-year-old transgender boy, Kyler Prescott, committed suicide about five weeks after staying at the hospital in 2015 where he was treated for having suicidal thoughts and self-inflicted wounds.
Cancer patients may be overly optimistic about early drug trial participation
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 17:58:06 -0400
By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - People with cancer may overestimate the possible benefits to them of participating in an early trial of a new medicine, even after talking with a doctor about what to expect, according to a new study from the U.K. So-called phase 1 trials of experimental treatments are intended to test the drug's safety. Just 4 percent to 20 percent of participants may see their cancer respond to the drug, the authors write in the journal Cancer.
Kite immunotherapy drug helps blood cancer patients in study
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 17:40:37 -0400
(Reuters) - Kite Pharma Inc on Monday said its experimental CAR T-cell therapy, which helps the immune system fight cancer, was highly effective in treating aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, although two deaths were related to the drug, according to interim data from a midstage trial. Shares of Kite, which had been halted before the release of the news, rose 11 percent when trading resumed. Some 76 percent of patients taking the drug, called KTE-C19, showed significant tumor shrinkage, including 47 percent who had no remaining signs of cancer at least three months after receiving the treatment, Kite said.
More U.S. babies born addicted to opiates like heroin
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 17:40:13 -0400
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - The proportion of U.S. babies born suffering from withdrawal syndrome after exposure to heroin or prescription opiates in utero has more than doubled in less than a decade, a study suggests. Researchers focused on what’s known as neonatal abstinence syndrome, a condition akin to withdrawal that develops when babies essentially become addicted to drugs their mothers use during pregnancy. Nationally, the rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome involving mothers’ use of opiates - which includes heroin as well as prescription narcotics like codeine and Vicodin - surged from 2.8 cases for every 1,000 births in 2009 to 7.3 cases for every 1,000 births in 2013, the study found.
Walking is medicine? It helped high-risk seniors stay mobile
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 17:08:26 -0400
FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, an elderly couple walks down a hall in Easton, Pa. It's not too late to get moving: Simple physical activity, mostly walking, helped high-risk seniors stay mobile after disability-inducing ailments even if, at 70 and beyond, they'd long been couch potatoes. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not too late to get moving: Simple physical activity — mostly walking — helped high-risk seniors stay mobile after disability-inducing ailments even if, at 70 and beyond, they'd long been couch potatoes.


Poor exercise habits may follow teens into adulthood
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:08:31 -0400
Clients work out on machines at the Bally Total Fitness facility in ArvadaBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Most American teenagers don’t get enough exercise, and they often stick with their sedentary ways as they enter adulthood, a U.S. study suggests. More than 9 in 10 adolescents fail to get the minimum 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous daily physical activity recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers report in the journal Pediatrics. “Physical inactivity is one of the major predictors of childhood and adolescent obesity, the consequences of which increases incidence of obesity as well as metabolic syndrome in adulthood,” said lead study author Kaigang Li, a researcher at Colorado State University in Fort Collins.


Mylan faces scrutiny over EpiPen profit data shown to Congress
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:39:41 -0400
A file photo showing the EpiPen auto-injection epinephrine pens manufactured by Mylan NV pharmaceutical company are seen in WashingtonMylan has been widely criticized for sharply raising the price of EpiPens, which are carried by people with life-threatening allergies. Mylan, which acquired the product in 2007, has raised the list price for a pair of EpiPens to $600 from about $100 in 2008. Lawmakers are trying to determine whether Mylan made more money on EpiPen than warranted from state Medicaid programs by having it classified as a generic product, resulting in much smaller rebates to the government health plans.


Nestle executive Cantarell quits after 40 years, sparking reshuffle
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:27:10 -0400
The Nestle logo is pictured on the company headquarters entrance building in VeveyLuis Cantarell, who heads Nestle's Europe, Middle East and North Africa zone and has been an advocate of blurring the lines between food and pharmaceuticals, is stepping down after 40 years, the Swiss company said on Monday. Cantarell will be replaced in January by Marco Settembri, head of Nestle's water division, which will now be run by Maurizio Paternello, who moves from Nestle Russia and Eurasia, the company said in a statement.


Drugmaker Pfizer decides not to break up business
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:12:11 -0400
Drugmaker Pfizer decides not to break up businessTRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Drug giant Pfizer says it won't split into two publicly traded companies, despite pressure from investors frustrated by its lagging stock price, ending years of Wall Street speculation over its strategy and future.


Yahoo Health News
BBC Health News
Dilute honey 'may fight urine infections'
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 23:09:13 GMT
A simple mix of honey and water might be a useful weapon against urine infections in hospital patients, according to researchers.
Illnesses associated with lifestyle cost the NHS £11bn
Sun, 25 Sep 2016 21:44:20 GMT
Health problems related to the way we live are costing the NHS in England alone around £11bn each year.
UK 'has never been more addicted to smartphones'
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 10:10:41 GMT
One in three people check their phone in the middle of the night and admit their overuse is causing rows with partners, according to a report by Deloitte.
'Smart drug' warning for students
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 14:38:56 GMT
The government's watchdog issues a warning to students about the dangers of taking cognitive enhancers or "smart drugs".
Body fat link to bacteria in faeces
Sun, 25 Sep 2016 23:35:05 GMT
The make up of the bacteria found in human faeces may influence levels of dangerous fat in our bodies, say researchers from King's College London.
Junior doctors call off five-day strikes over contracts
Sat, 24 Sep 2016 21:17:29 GMT
Junior doctors in England suspend a series of five-day strikes over the next three months, the British Medical Association announces, following concerns over patient safety,
Osteoporosis tests 'could save Welsh NHS £4.5m'
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 05:40:32 GMT
More services in Wales to help diagnose osteoporosis could save the NHS £4.5m a year, a charity claims.
Women's mental health needs 'not considered adequately'
Sun, 25 Sep 2016 09:28:18 GMT
Women's mental health needs are "not being considered" despite rising rates of suicide, campaigners warn.
Four in 10 children not going to dentist, NHS figures show
Fri, 23 Sep 2016 12:45:07 GMT
More than 40% of children in England did not see a dentist last year, NHS statistics show - a figure the British Dental Association says is embarrassing.
Google Deepmind: Should patients trust the company with their data?
Thu, 22 Sep 2016 23:47:24 GMT
Google has ambitious plans for using medical records and appears to also be bidding to create a truly digitised NHS.
'Thousands' hit by late-cancelled operations
Thu, 22 Sep 2016 09:25:10 GMT
Tens of thousands of operations were cancelled by English hospitals last year but not officially counted, figures seen by the BBC suggest.
Irish abortion laws: Protests held across the world
Sat, 24 Sep 2016 17:53:30 GMT
Thousands of protesters march in Dublin and 20 other world cities to press their demand for a referendum to repeal Ireland's abortion laws.
Period pain affects 'most women workers'
Thu, 22 Sep 2016 23:40:59 GMT
Most women workers have experienced period pain that affects their ability to work, a survey suggests.
Professor David Nutt developed 'hangover-free' alcohol
Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:49:56 GMT
A scientist has developed a new type of alcohol which he claims will not damage the liver or leave you with a hangover.
What a button battery can do to a child's throat
Thu, 22 Sep 2016 10:32:33 GMT
Medical correspondent Fergus Walsh demonstrates what can happen if a button battery gets lodged in a child's throat, after a warning from surgeons over the dangers.
Smoking is at a record low, so why do people still do it?
Tue, 20 Sep 2016 14:08:54 GMT
Smokers say stress keeps them in the habit, as smoking rates in England hit a record low
Smiling with sadness
Mon, 19 Sep 2016 10:54:01 GMT
The black women using art to talk about mental health.
How emergency services rescue obese people
Mon, 19 Sep 2016 12:18:14 GMT
Training exercise shows how emergency services cope with obese people who get stuck in their homes.
Bone marrow donor stranger is now 'like a brother'
Sat, 17 Sep 2016 09:56:04 GMT
When Carl Hillis was struck with cancer at the age of nine, he received bone marrow from a perfect stranger. Carl says donor Tony Blood is "like a brother".
The doctors 'breaking the siege' in Aleppo via Skype
Tue, 13 Sep 2016 13:20:48 GMT
BBC Newsnight meets the UK doctor who is directing life-saving surgery in the Syrian city of Aleppo via Skype.
BBC Health News
USA Today Health News
Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Mon, 02 Apr 2012 14:15:12 GMT
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.
      
 
 
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
Sun, 01 Apr 2012 17:28:19 GMT
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.
      
 
 
Black women have trouble clearing cervical cancer virus
Tue, 03 Apr 2012 15:27:11 GMT
Provocative new research might help explain why black women are so much more likely than whites to develop and die from cervical cancer.
      
 
 
FDA rejects call to ban BPA from food packaging
Mon, 02 Apr 2012 14:05:53 GMT
The FDA has rejected a petition from environmentalists that would have banned BPA from all food and drink packaging.
      
 
 
Surgeon general urges new focus on suicide prevention
Mon, 10 Sep 2012 20:59:06 GMT
The Obama administration is urging a new focus on preventing suicides and is beefing up the nation's crisis hotline to help.
      
 
 
My Semicolon Life: Setting new goals
Fri, 07 Sep 2012 20:26:22 GMT
USA TODAY music writer Brian Mansfield chronicles his life with colon cancer.
      
 
 
Company seeks more approval for clot blocker
Fri, 07 Sep 2012 21:27:36 GMT
Johnson & Johnson gave the FDA additional data on its new anti-clotting drug, in a second attempt to get approval for more uses.
      
 
 
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 22:30:00 GMT
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.
      
 
 
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 15:25:52 GMT
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.
      
 
 
Ouch! Hospital to review woman's $83,046 scorpion sting bill
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 15:26:33 GMT
An Arizona hospital that billed a woman $83,046 for scorpion sting treatment said it will adjust her bill and review its price.
      
 
 
Most grandparents provide care for the grandkids
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 14:49:57 GMT
Two new reports find lots of babysitting and financial support for their grandkids, as grandchildren try to save their children money.
     
 
 
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 02:34:37 GMT
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.
     
 
 
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 01:43:40 GMT
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.
     
 
 
War might be making young bodies old
Wed, 05 Sep 2012 21:56:51 GMT
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.
     
 
 
7-year-old Colo. girl recovers from bubonic plague
Thu, 06 Sep 2012 15:11:59 GMT
The parents of 7-year-old Sierra Jane Downing thought she had the flu when she felt sick days after camping in southwest Colorado.
     
 
 
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